jueves, 2 de julio de 2009

Braciole Harvesting Ideas

Sometimes an idea infiltrates your consciousness. Starting like an inconspicuous tuft of green in a stone wall it begins to climb spreading shoots and runners until one day you notice it as though it sprang overnight to cover the entire collection of stones. This is how braciole grew in my mind.

I first heard of it on a cooking show but, involved with something else, I wasn't really watching. I heard the name, noticed a couple of the ingredients, and looked up at the end to catch a glimpse of the finished dish. That was around nine months ago and during the time the idea of braciole had grown until it was something I had to fix.

I suspected the rolling, which would in effect change it from a steak to a roast, would improve results. I was right.

Braciole is not a particularly complicated or elegant dish. It's simply a piece of meat — most often beef or veal and sometimes pork — wrapped around a stuffing and then braised. Sometimes it's made using scaloppini in individual portions and sometimes it's prepared as a large roast. I had guests coming for dinner last weekend and decided it was time to harvest.

I looked up a dozen or more recipes in books I had and on the Web. I began my search with a couple of prejudices that had already formed in my mind. First, I wanted to do a roast and not individual rolls. Second, the sauce should be based on fresh tomatoes (that's one reason I hadn't already made it). Eventually I put together a recipe.

For the meat I decided on round steak. This isn't a cut I use often. It has a good flavor — nice and beefy — but as a working muscle it's tough. Furthermore, it has little fat to lubricate and ameliorate the tough fibers and because it's a steak and not a roast, slow cooking typically just wrings what juice it does have out of it. But I suspected the rolling, which would in effect change it from a steak to a roast, would improve results. I was right.

The meal and the braciole were a success. The meat was reasonably tender and richly flavored with a luscious broth (serve with plenty of bread for sopping).

SOURCE:

http://seriouslygood.kdweeks.com/

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario